Scene it?

In the last entry, I transcribed my field notes from an excursion to a local bookstore cafe. In this entry, I’m going to go a step further and attempt to morph those notes into two distinct scenes. Your comments will help me determine if I’ve been successful or not.

Scene One

The cafe wasn’t overly crowded. It was Tuesday evening, around 7:30 p.m., which was usually a slow time for the cafe to begin with.

I had ordered a cannoli to go with my cappuccino, and was adding sugar to the cappuccino when I heard a female voice behind me.

“Excuse me,” it said.

I mumbled apologies and got out of her way. She was a dark-skinned female, late 20s to early 30s, with a Caribbean accent – possibly Creole. She started to fix her drink and exchange pleasantries. She had a laptop under her left arm and I inquired about it. She stated that she was at the cafe because of the free wi-fi and was going to be updating her resume.

“I’ll probably be here until they close,” she said. She opened her mouth, presumably to say something else, but closed it after looking down at my left hand and most likely noticing the wedding band. She smiled and bade me good evening, and sat down at a table. She opened her laptop and began to work.

A short time later, her phone rang and she began to speak in a language I couldn’t recognize. As she did so, she glanced over at me and glanced back. Her right hand began to fiddle with the band that was on the ring finger of her left hand, and she turned her back to me.

Scene Two

There were four tables pushed together in the cafe. A group of eight well-dressed men sat at them. They ranged in age from their early 30s to their late 50s.

Like every other Tuesday night, these men had gotten together for their weekly Bible study.

The men drank their coffees and teas and lattes and engaged in lively conversation. The elder members often took control of the conversation and directed the course of the study. Occasionally a younger member would have a question which gave the older members pause, and they consulted their Bibles.

Even that, though, didn’t always provide an immediate answer.

“But it says something different in the King James version,” one member said.

And the conversation continued. They talked about Proverbs, about Corinthians and about Acts. They went off-topic and discussed their personal lives, and went back on-topic by comparing events in their lives to Bible verses.

There was a camaraderie about these men; a sense of brotherhood. They clearly enjoyed the company of one another, and would undoubtedly be at the cafe the next Tuesday, studying and laughing together.

Advertisements

About Joseph F. Berenato

Joseph F. Berenato obtained a B.A. in English and spent four years as the entertainment editor of The Hammonton Gazette before returning to his roots at his family's blueberry farm in Hammonton, NJ. In 2014, Joe conceived, edited, and contributed to New Life and New Civilizations: Exploring Star Trek Comics. He also co-edited three books examining Star Wars and two books examining Planet of the Apes for Sequart with Rich Handley. Joe wrote the introduction for IDW Publishing's Star Trek: Gold Key Archives Volume 3 as well as retrospective essays for that company’s Star Trek #50 and their Star Trek Gold Key 100-Page Spectacular. He also contributed to ATB Publishing's Star Trek anthology Outside In Boldly Goes. He holds a Master of Arts in Writing from Rowan University, and is an adjunct professor with Atlantic Cape Community College in Mays Landing, NJ, where he teaches freshman composition and serves as advisor for the school’s student-run newspaper, the Atlantic Cape Review. You can find Joe at jfberenato.wordpress.com or at www.dinernation.com, and on Twitter at @JFBerenato.
This entry was posted in Fieldnotes and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Scene it?

  1. Pingback: Hair One Minute, Gone The Next; and a Reflection | Joseph F. Berenato

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s